Breast Cancer Awareness

Breast cancer can occur in both men and women. It is most common in women. 1 in 8 women will develop an invasive breast cancer in her life time.

Signs and Symptoms:

  • A breast lump or thickening that feels different from the surrounding tissue
  • Bloody discharge from the nipple
  • Change in the size or shape of a breast
  • Changes to the skin over the breast, such as dimpling
  • Inverted nipple
  • Peeling or flaking of the nipple skin
  • Redness or pitting of the skin over your breast, like the skin of an orange

Illustration demonstrating breast self-exam

 National Cancer Institute’s (NCI) recommendations for screening mammograms:

  • Women age 40 and older should have mammograms every 1 to 2 years.
  • Women who are at higher than average risk of breast cancer should talk with their health care providers about whether to have mammograms before age 40 and how often to have them.
  • How much does a mammogram cost? The cost of screening mammograms varies by state and by facility, and can depend on insurance coverage. However, most states have laws that require health insurance companies to reimburse all or part of the cost of screening mammograms. Women are encouraged to contact their mammography facility or their health insurance company for information about cost and coverage.

    All women age 40 and older with Medicare can get a screening mammogram each year. Medicare will also pay for one baseline mammogram for female beneficiaries between the ages of 35 and 39. There is no deductible requirement for this benefit, but Medicare beneficiaries have to pay 20 percent of the Medicare-approved amount. Information about Medicare coverage is available at http://www.medicare.gov on the Internet, or through the Medicare Hotline at 1–800–MEDICARE.

  • How can uninsured or low-income women obtain a free or low-cost screening mammogram? Some state and local health programs and employers provide mammograms free or at low cost. For example, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) coordinates the National Breast and Cervical Cancer Early Detection Program. This program provides screening services, including clinical breast exams and mammograms, to low-income, uninsured women throughout the United States and in several U.S. territories. Contact information for local programs is available on the CDC’s Web site at http://apps.nccd.cdc.gov/cancercontacts/nbccedp/contacts.asp or by calling the CDC at 1–800–CDC–INFO.
  • Information about low-cost or free mammography screening programs is also available through NCI’s Cancer Information Service (CIS) at 1–800–4–CANCER Women can also check with their local hospital, health department, women’s center, or other community groups to find out how to access low-cost or free mammograms.
  • How much does a mammogram cost? The cost of screening mammograms varies by state and by facility, and can depend on insurance coverage. However, most states have laws that require health insurance companies to reimburse all or part of the cost of screening mammograms. Women are encouraged to contact their mammography facility or their health insurance company for information about cost and coverage.
  • Information for Chemung county in New York: http://www.health.state.ny.us/nysdoh/cancer/center/partnerships/chemung.htm
  • Check out a few of these site to make donates, get more breats cancer information, donate, and buy great products.

    http://ww5.komen.org/

    http://www.feelyourboobies.com/

    http://www.savethetatas.com/

    Also keep your eyes open for local events that support Breast cancer!

    ♥ Feel your boobies!

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